Úvodní stránka » NEWS » Riff Cohen
Riff Cohen — A Paris [2013]

 Riff Cohen — À Paris [2013]

Riff Cohen — A Paris
Born: 1984, Ramat Aviv Gimmel, Tel Aviv
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel ~ Paris, France
Genres: Musiques du monde, Musique, Variété française
Album release: April 4, 2013
Record Label: AZ
Duration:     46:46
Tracks:
01. Dans mon quartier       2:09
02. Une femme assise        3:38
03. Sur le macadam        2:39
04. A Paris        2:17
05. Greetings        4:16
06. Je cours        2:25
07. Jean qui rit Jean qui pleure        4:17
08. Le rat et la princesse        2:49
09. J'aime        3:33
10. Meshoch Be Gufi        4:51
11. Rotza Prahim        2:44
12. Chut...        3:43
13. Hine Ha Or        3:53
14. Tzama Nafshi        3:32
2012 AZ  //  Lenny Ben Bassat / Riff Cohen written tracks: 1, 3, 9, 12
Riff Cohen written tracks: 2, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 14
Hamza el Din written track 5
Traditional: track 4

INTERVIEW by Nicolas Roux
→   So you’ve had enough from the all-you-can-hear music buffet. It’s gone way past indigestion. They sell it as the brand-new-must-listen-to, yet it all sounds like it’s been heard time and time again.
→   As you’re trying to run away, Riff Cohen’s silhouette rises. You look up. She’s standing there on top of a mount of olives with an oud in one hand and a microphone in the other.
→   Riff hails from Tel Aviv.  She’s of North African Sephardic descent. She sings mostly in French to non-French audiences. Her music could be summed up as an Oriental, trash-pop  kind of thing.  But don’t bother trying to label it.  Her music ditches genre in favour of pure emotion. She’s just Riff Cohen, bubbly at times, melancholic at others.  Her career has just taken off, and rest assured, there’s more to come.
→   I interviewed Riff Cohen at Café Marcel in Monmartre à Paris. We did the interview in English for the fine Shtetl readers (but imagine thick French accents while you read).
Nicolas: You’ve just released the album A Paris.  It blends a few different styles: a bit of  North African influences, Middle Eastern influences,  some rock, electronic beats and so on. Where do you fit in all that?
Riff: Actually my influences are even larger. I started in the alternative scene and this album is in fact the most popular music I have recorded. I tried to be as coherent as possible but I was myself surprised to see how vast the influences ended up being.
Nicolas: How do you want to be seen as an artist?
Riff: In this particular production I wanted to show the rock influence of North African music.  But in a trashy and urban way.  North African people who live in Israeli cities have no real contact with North Africa.  They don’t speak Arabic but at the same time they are rooted in North Africa.  I’m kind of like that.  When I see my grandmother who’s from North Africa, I can see how different we are. Israel is quite modern, I had a good education but my grandmother can’t read and write.  And I see that, wow, if I was born in North Africa, I’d be completely different. I couldn’t wear  jeans and t-shirts. My grandmother still wears a scarf over her head and she’s also quite religious.
Nicolas: On the cover of your album, there’s a picture of your grandmother (see below). On the booklet there are pictures of you with the same haircut. Is the album a tribute to her?  How important has your grandmother been to you?
Riff:  She’s very important to me. She’s a symbol of traditions being wiped out completely by modernity. I feel Israel is doing that and I think it’s not so good.  I have the urge to learn everything that she does like cooking or even the way she thinks philosophically. I think it’s very important.
Nicolas: Was your grandmother an inspiration in terms of music as well?
Riff: Of course.  My grandparents are from Djerba in Tunisia.  They aren’t musicians but they have strong cultural bonds to their home town. My other grandparents are from Algeria. They listen to artists like Maurice El Medioni and… errr… I forgot his name… (extremely long pause here) because it’s Sunday!
Nicolas:  I should let people know we’re doing this interview on a Sunday so it’s very chill.
Riff:  Oh yeah, it’s Enrico Macias!
Nicolas: Enrico Macias?! He’s a star here in France.  How could you forget his name!
Riff: And I even performed on stage alongside him!
Nicolas: It must have been a great experience if you remember it so well!
Riff: (Laughs.) It’s because I ate of lot of olives yesterday during Shabbat and it’s said to be bad for memory.
Nicolas:  Ok then I forgive you, but I’m not sure Enrico will! On your album, one particular song caught my attention. You did a cover of Hamza El Din’s tune called Greetings. The original song is an acoustic song with oud, percussions and vocals but you made a kind of trash rock remix version. I loved it, but do you think Hamza would approve?
Riff:  I heard the original song was recorded in China. He also lived in NYC so it’s not like he came from a bubble in Africa. He was open-minded so I think he would definitely like it!
Nicolas: On the song  A Paris, you talk about the city, what you do here. Coming from Tel Aviv, what do you like about Paris? The handbags? The romantic streets of Montmartre?
Riff: (Laughs.) I really like Paris but this city also has a negative side. I don’t really feel home here. I feel like a stranger. When I live here, I discover myself. That’s how I’ve realised that I’m a Mediterranean person. As for the song, I wanted to show the new Paris. It’s no longer only about Coco Chanel, la Tour Eiffel, being beautiful, glamorous and shiny. It’s also dark sometimes. It’s mixed with many cultures, including North Africa’s. This is Paris today.
Nicolas: How would you compare the music scene in Paris with the one in Tel Aviv or Israel in general?
Riff: I’ve realised that Israel is a peripheral country. When you live in the periphery, you want to be like the centre i.e. Europe or the US.  In Israel, musicians are generally aware of what’s going on in the world. But when I talk to young musicians in Paris, they seem to be in a bubble.  In Israel, I’m quite surprised that musicians are usually much more open-minded than the ones who are in the centre.
Nicolas:  You sing mostly in French but also in Hebrew or Arabic. Do feel more Israeli, Jewish, French, North African?
Riff: It’s quite mixed. In Israel, they call people like me Moroccan French. And it’s true that’s what I am. I’m Jewish, North African, Israeli, French.  But deep inside, I see myself as the new generation of Israelis and I feel very Jewish.
Nicolas:  Your lyrics feel kind of playful at times. You know, in a childish way. Do you like playing games?
Riff: Yes I play dominos with my grandmother.
Nicolas: Are you a bad loser?
Riff: Yes I am because she’s really good! (Laughs.) She used to play  every Shabbat with her friends. And when I play with her, she already knows what I have in my hands!
Nicolas: What place does music have in your life?
Riff: When I was younger I really liked to dance to electronic music like Grime. Then I also went to a lot of classical music concerts when I studied musicology. I’m quite open-minded and it’s a good thing that Tel Aviv is very open when it comes to culture and music.
Nicolas:  Did you always want to be a musician?
Riff: When I grew up, I was always in front of MTV, singing. I really liked pop music and it was clear that I wanted to be a singer. When I grew older, I discovered more profound music and I became more of a musician and an intellectual. I got into the alternative scene. But now, I can say I have nothing against pop. My aim is actually to do quality pop music. I’d like to go as far as I can with my record label Universal.  Somehow, I’m seeing the world as I did when I was a child, in a happy and very positive way.
Nicolas: If you could choose any musician to adopt you as a goddaughter, who would it be?
Riff: Wow! (Laughs.) It would be Bjork. I kind of grew up in her hands. Not necessarily in terms of music. It’s rather her creativity and open-mindedness. You feel you can do everything. There’s no limit. She blends different sorts of arts. For instance, when you watch her videos, you can really see her whole universe. I feel she educated me. So, Bjork.
Nicolas: In conclusion, it’s official! We have found Bjork’s spiritual daughter. It’s Riff Cohen and you read it here first on Shtetl! Fortaken: http://shtetlmontreal.com/
REVIEW
→   "Le parcours de Riff Cohen, c’est un peu la parabole de l’enfant prodigue, de la traversée du désert et du prophète pas si nul en son pays, tout mélangé et légèrement compliqué (ou pas) par l’histoire personnelle de la demoiselle. Née en Israël, oui (à Tel-Aviv, en 1984) mais de parents originaires d’Afrique du Nord (Algérie et Tunisie), avec un détour par le sud de la France du côté maternel (d’où ses chansons en français). →   “J’ai grandi dans les quartiers bobos du nord de Tel-Aviv, mais avec de la famille dans les quartiers chauds et popus du Sud, et en faisant des allers-retours à Nice chez mes grands-parents… Un mélange culturel intéressant.”
→   En Israël, Cohen est un nom commun (bien que propre), mais Riff un prénom rare. La chanteuse ne connaît qu’une autre personne prénommée Riff, et c’est un garçon. →   Quand elle a 9 ans, et déjà quelques années de piano, de danse et d’éducation artistique derrière elle, un musicien de jazz lui apprend que “riff” est aussi un mot du registre musical. En psycho-généalogie de comptoir (ou de terrasse ensoleillée), on appelle ça une prédestination.
→   Des riffs, il y en a plein partout dans le premier album de Riff. Des riffs ébouriffants, vifs, chauds bouillants, des guitares surf sur des rythmes nord-africains et des mélodies orientales qui ondulent du bassin méditerranéen. Tout ça n’est pas formellement nouveau, mais Riff Cohen y apporte sa fraîcheur, son énergie, sa voix de gamine bédouine malicieuse, ses chansons entre fou rire et larmes, comme des comptines enfantines. “Je suis entrée dans la musique par le classique, les études de musicologie, le côté très intello. Ce disque, c’est sans doute ce que je ferai de plus pop dans ma vie, j’ai d’autres répertoires, des choses piano-voix que je garde pour plus tard. Ce mélange de rock et de musique orientale, il est naturel pour moi : quand j’ai écouté de la musique nord-africaine, j’y ai entendu le rock, quand je vois les danses gnaoua avec la tête qui tourne, c’est comme dans le metal… Il suffisait de le faire sortir”, dit la chanteuse qui croque les “r” et ressemble, de près comme de loin, à la cousine d’Olivia Ruiz." ( source: www.lesinrocks.com )
→   Une "request" de mon ami lddd. Bonne idée, parce que c'est effectivement un album très agréable à l'écoute, de la pop rafraîchissante, bref un rayon de soleil qui tombe à pic pour contrer la morosité ambiante.
Website: http://www.riff-cohen.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/riffcohen
Press: Liron Pinhassi — — +972 543222166
Agent: Israel : SHUKI WEISS — +97235280505 // Europe CARAMBA — — +33142181717
Biography:
→   Riff Cohen est née en 1984 à Tel Aviv et y a grandi dans « une atmosphère bohème ». Elle est la fille aînée d’Israël et de Patricia Cohen qui tenaient une galerie d’art et un café dans la rue Shenkin, l’une des plus animées de la ville. La famille de son père est originaire de Djerba en Tunisie. Sa mère est née à Tlemcen en Algérie, mais a passé son enfance à Nice. C’est dans cette matrice culturelle méditerranéenne et nord-africaine qu’elle a été élevée. Patricia est aujourd’hui professeur de yoga et écrit des poèmes dont certains ont été mis en musique par sa fille. Avec des études de piano et de danse dès l’âge de 4 ans, des cours d’art dramatique à 6, Riff aurait pu faire une overdose de gammes, de tirades, d’entrechats. Mais piquée au jeu de l’art et de l’expression, elle se lance dans la composition à 8 ans. Suivront d’autres études et de nombreux projets. Rock, electro, musiques du monde, chant classique indien ou européen, son vocabulaire s’enrichit au gré des expériences. Elle en vient rapidement à signer des musiques pour le théâtre et le cinéma. Également comédienne, on la voit dans des séries télévisées ou des films dont l’adaptation du roman de Valérie Zenatti La Bouteille A La Mer de Gaza. En 2008, Riff s’installe à la Cité Internationale des Arts pour créer. De retour chez elle après 3 ans passés en France, elle s’attelle au répertoire de l’album A Paris, qu’elle va produire elle-même, tout en faisant des apparitions remarquées sur scène, dont la première partie des Red Hot Chili Peppers au Parc Hayarkon de Tel Aviv l’automne dernier.
→   L’un des visuels de l’album A Paris- recto de la pochette israélienne- est une photo en noir et blanc de sa grand-mère paternelle Fortuna, prise à Djerba la veille de son mariage alors qu’elle avait 14 ans. Tout un symbole. Car cet album traduit à la fois un enracinement et une liberté que cette image d’une autre époque résume à merveille. →   Farouche et innocente, d’une féminité sans fard, d’une détermination sans faille, telle est l’expression de cette jeune fille. Telles sont les vertus de cette musique qui prend à rebours tous les genres avec une bienveillante et souvent rigolote désinvolture. →   Si on pense aux Rita Mitsouko en écoutant Sur le Macadam, à Brigitte Fontaine dans Une Femme Assise, c’est que ces deux références font sens depuis que Riff a repris sur scène Marcia Baila des uns et Le Nougat de l’autre. Alors chanson française désorientée ou rock orientalisé? Les deux, forcément, tant les mots de Patricia à l’imaginaire enfantin, aux rimes en coq à l’âne et en ricochets, tiennent en parfait équilibre sur des cordes de guitares très sixties, quand elles ne sont pas suspendues à celles d’un luth arabe à l’identité traditionnelle. Dans Mon Quartier  célèbre cette harmonie des genres dans une jubilatoire promiscuité qui accueille, entre autres, des filles qui ont « les cheveux hirsutes » et des garçons qui « portent parfois des jupes ». →   Quand bien même Riff est-elle obligée de conclure que ce quartier « reste à inventer», on trouve dans J’aime confirmation d’un même esprit ouvert à tout et à tous, mais qui  entend rester lui-même. C’est bien ce qui enchante dans ce disque, cet art du zapping enraciné qui passe du marrant néo yéyé de Je Cours à la belle et grave psalmodie de Tzama Nafshi,  de la ballade onirique de Chut... à la transe de Hine Ha Or, du français au nubien et à l’hébreu, de Gossip à Lili Bonniche. C’est ainsi qu’on traverse dans A Paris cette modernité caractéristique de notre époque, qui rend tout à la fois disponible et ludique en quelques clicks. Mais on y traverse aussi la rue, celle où vivent les vrais gens avec de vraies histoires, où l’on éprouve de vraies sensations.
→   A Paris ce fut d’abord une chanson où Riff Cohen partageait sa vision très personnelle, orientale et africaine, de la capitale. Le clip, visionné près de 800 000 fois sur YouTube, a pour ainsi dire établi sa réputation en Israël et au delà.
→    On y voit cette jeune chanteuse à la frimousse épanouie engagée dans une danse du ventre sur les quais de Seine, les trottoirs et dans les bistrots. Images d’une bonne humeur qui gagne des gens issus de différentes communautés. Sans chercher à jouer les blanches colombes de la paix ou les émissaires de la réconciliation, Riff Cohen, tel le joueur de flûte d’Hamelin, réussit comme par enchantement à entraîner dans le sillage de cette rengaine accrocheuse un échantillon du monde tel qu’il est aujourd’hui, multiple et bigarré.
→   A Paris c’est aujourd’hui un premier album, à peine sorti en Israël et déjà classé parmi les meilleures ventes du pays, où Riff Cohen fait irruption sur la scène musicale hexagonale avec une énergie, une fraîcheur, une fantaisie qui font du bien. Un disque de 14 titres qui se parcourt comme un marché aux épices, où l’on est assailli d’odeurs et de couleurs, où l’on fait des rencontres improbables, où l’on entend des histoires à rêver debout en étant aspiré dans un tourbillon sonore qui échappe à la stérilité fébrile de notre époque. Car A Paris a beau découler de différentes sources musicales, procéder d’un bric-à-brac où se côtoient rock et variété orientale, chanson française et rythmes gnaouas, folk et psaume biblique, il n’en affirme pas moins une cohérence intimement liée au récit familial de la chanteuse qui lui évite ainsi le pastiche ou le photocopiage de styles antérieurs.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Riff Cohen — A Paris [2013]

 

NEWS

5.12.2013

Erika Stucky

5.12.2013

Glen Hansard

5.12.2013

Teenage Guitar

4.12.2013

The Residents

4.12.2013

Gossling

4.12.2013

Chris Morphitis

4.12.2013

Conrad Schnitzler

4.12.2013

Barton Carroll

4.12.2013

Sumie

3.12.2013

Keller Quartett

archiv

ALBUM COVERS III.

Andrew Bird — I Want to See Pulaski at Night EP (2013)
Tais Awards
Průmyslová 11, 102 19 Praha 10, Czech Republic
+420608841540